State-Level Heraldic Authorities

 
Michael F. McCartney
 
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Michael F. McCartney
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09 April 2015 16:12
 

That’s why Joe is still Director of Research!

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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09 April 2015 16:27
 

I found the Barton piece because John DuLong asked me to read his draft article on it before it was published in The Armigers’ News.

The whole thing is on the ACH website, www.americancollegeofheraldry.org/TANJUL07.htm

 
David Pope
 
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David Pope
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09 April 2015 16:42
 

Thanks for the Barton link!

 
David Pope
 
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David Pope
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09 April 2015 16:53
 

Joe,

Do you know of any internet access to Barton’s first essay, "Concise Account of the Origin and Use of Coat Armour…"?

 

David

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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09 April 2015 18:14
 

I think I have a copy of Barton’s first essay, also courtesy of John DuLong. Let me see if I can find it and upload it for reference.

 
David Pope
 
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David Pope
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09 April 2015 18:18
 

Thanks.

 
David Pope
 
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David Pope
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10 April 2015 08:06
 

Joseph McMillan;103846 wrote:

Here’s William Barton (principal designer of the U.S. national arms), writing in about 1815.

As for the notion that obtaining a grant of arms from the English (or Scottish) heralds involves surmounting a barrier of any consequence other than the overdraft limit on one’s checking account, I refer you to Oswald Barron’s classic, "The Genuinely Armigerous Person" (1903). Mr. Barron is, alas, also no longer available for telepathic second-guessing of motives.

 

https://books.google.com/books?id=8jwj6r_YCusC&pg=PA155&lpg=PA155


I read the Barton essay and the underlying publication by Phillamore that Barron critiques last night.  The Phillamore piece was actually quite interesting, although a bit off from place to place.  I’ll read Barron sometime today.

 

I found the Barton essay a lot of fun to read after I got past the introduction.  I thought the following excerpt was well-said, and goes a long way in explaining why someone might want to pursue a grant from an ancestral country:


Quote:

The sort of relationship which men bear to the country of their ancestors is not extinguished by either the removal of themselves or the migration of their forefathers to one under a different dominion. In general the allegiance primarily due by all to the sovereignty of that country in which they were born is transferred by the emigrant to the country in which he finds his residency and establishes (which is termed by civilians) his domicile: this is an obligation which he owes to the government of his adopted country; at least, so long as he remains, in the character of a citizen, within its territory and the jurisdiction of its sovereign authority.

The esteem, nevertheless, which most men continue to feel, wherever their home may be, for the native land of their forefathers, is founded, as already observed, in the principles of human nature. It springs from virtuous and praiseworthy dispositions; and, like charity, humanity, and the love of kindred—virtues which produce the most beneficent conduct—it enlarges the sphere of our benevolence, without diminishing the obligations of other and paramount duties. We are bound by every tie of fidelity and interest to promote the welfare of that country, whose government protects us in the enjoyment of our just rights: yet these obligations, strong as they are, prove by no means incompatible with a liberal regard for the people of kindred-nations. The truest patriot will be actuated by feelings of goodwill towards a people whose kindred blood flows in his veins; and while the virtues of his ancestors will be indelibly impressed on his mind, he will, himself, strive to transmit to his descendants similar examples of public and private worth. On the other hand, little can any man be expected to do, for either the honour or the benefit of posterity, who is regardless of the memory of his forefathers.

 

Allied, by consanguinity, to some of the greatest and most distinguished nations of the old world, as the people of the United States are, it is a natural consequence of such relationship that our citizens should retain a kind of instinctive attachment to the people of those countries, respectively. We have already been a distinct and independent nation, eight-and-thirty years—yet we find, that a kindly regard for the countries of our respective forefathers appears to be unabated.8 Hence it is, that we observe in many of our principal towns several assemblages of the Sons of St. George—of St. Andrew—of St. Patrick—of St. David—and of Herman; for the purposes of celebrating their relationship to the several nations, which those tutelary characters represent, and of manifesting the benevolent dispositions of the members of these associations, towards such of their kindred countrymen as may stand in need of counsel, assistance, or charity. Nevertheless, we perceive the individuals who constitute these various societies, not only harmonizing with each other; as brethren of the same national family; but performing, with fidelity and zeal, all the duties they owe to the country of their adoption—their common home.

 

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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10 April 2015 09:31
 

I’m not sure Barton would agree that the sentiments he outlines in his second paper would justify Americans in seeking grants from British heraldic authorities (something they couldn’t have done at the time anyway, with the possible exception of Irish emigrĂ©s and Ulster King of Arms). That’s why he proposed a private office of arms.

As promised, here’s the 1788 paper he forwarded asking for Washington’s endorsement, famously and politely declined, advocating an official U.S. office of arms. I think John DuLong published this is the Armiger’s News, so please treat his introduction as copyrighted material.

 

http://beaconsfield-strategy.com/BartonConcise.pdf

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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10 April 2015 09:37
 

Rereading the 1788 paper, I note that someone or something—probably MS Word spell-check—altered Barton’s word "martial" at the bottom of page 6 to "marital."  It is very likely true, based on more recent research on the origin of heraldry, that "Coat-Armour, therefore, was originally a mere personal mark or indication of honor and marital prowess," but I don’t think that’s what Barton intended to say.

 
David Pope
 
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David Pope
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10 April 2015 12:50
 

Joseph McMillan;103892 wrote:

I’m not sure Barton would agree that the sentiments he outlines in his second paper would justify Americans in seeking grants from British heraldic authorities (something they couldn’t have done at the time anyway, with the possible exception of Irish emigrĂ©s and Ulster King of Arms). That’s why he proposed a private office of arms.

As promised, here’s the 1788 paper he forwarded asking for Washington’s endorsement, famously and politely declined, advocating an official U.S. office of arms. I think John DuLong published this is the Armiger’s News, so please treat his introduction as copyrighted material.

 

http://beaconsfield-strategy.com/BartonConcise.pdf

 


Joe,

 

Thanks so much for making this available.

 

I agree with you that Barton would not have thought the comments that I posted supported the seeking of foreign grants.  Despite his original intent, I do think that he does a good job of identifying the somewhat curious connection that some Americans continue to feel with Scotland, England, or Ireland.  How else would one explain a bunch of Americans dressing up in kilts at next weekend’s highland games?

 

On second thought, don’t answer that question…;)

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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10 April 2015 19:35
 

David Pope;103896 wrote:

How else would one explain a bunch of Americans dressing up in kilts at next weekend’s highland games?

On second thought, don’t answer that question…;)


From what I’ve seen, it helps if they get into the single malt a day or so ahead of time.  (And from what I’ve seen, some who do (dress up in kilts), shouldn’t.)

 

Seriously, this is no different from people of East European ancestry or Italian ancestry or Greek or Mexican or Vietnamese ancestry dressing up in folk costumes and getting together to do traditional dances, eat traditional foods and so on.

 

But I’ve never heard anyone dancing the polka or chowing down on klobassa and pirohi at the annual Slavic festival at the local Ruthenian Catholic Church express the desire for any aspect of their personal identity to be placed under the regulation of an agency of the Ukrainian or Slovak governments.  That seems to be a peculiarity of Scottish-Americans and wannabe-Scottish-Americans.

 
Michael F. McCartney
 
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Michael F. McCartney
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10 April 2015 21:09
 

...of SOME Scottish Americans…

 
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07 May 2018 01:30
 

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