Researching Blazon

 
Dohrman Byers
 
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Dohrman Byers
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27 April 2010 14:35
 

I am working on a coat of arms for a friend recently ordained a permanent deacon. The family name is Dvorachek, which seems to be a slightly Americanized version of the Czech name/word dvorecek, meaning a yard or small farmyard. I thought I would propse the following arms, but I am searching to be sure it does not duplicate any existing arms. I would appreciate some help. Has anyone seen this elsewhere? Are there any places online that you recommend I search? I found nothing in Rietstap, but don’t know where to go next.

http://img230.imageshack.us/img230/6749/rsdg02.png

 

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Donnchadh
 
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Donnchadh
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28 April 2010 11:04
 

i like it. no i haven’t seen it before. but i’d wait for the more advanced heraldists than myself to answer.

 
Benjamin Thornton
 
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Benjamin Thornton
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28 April 2010 11:17
 

How three human feet?  As in 3 feet = 1 yard?

I’m kidding, of course.  I like canting arms, and I very much like your example - much more so than my bad pun.

 
Dohrman Byers
 
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Dohrman Byers
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28 April 2010 17:54
 

I love a bad pun; but since this one may end up on my church bulletin…well…thanks for the chuckle.

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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28 April 2010 19:37
 

Sort of hard to know how to research it—I’m not sure even how it would be blazoned in English, let alone other languages.

 
emrys
 
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emrys
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29 April 2010 03:36
 

It looks a bit like a "hollandse tuin" (Dutch garden) a peculiar piece of Dutch heraldry. Usually the piece was place around a shield but there are instances of it apearing inside a shield as well.

http://www.groenehartvertellingen.nl/afbeeldingen-verk-tegels/pilastertegel-wapen-RM_1.JPG

 

http://resolver.kb.nl/resolve?urn=urn:gvn:BVB01:MB1563DIPK&role=image&size=largest

 
Benjamin Thornton
 
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Benjamin Thornton
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29 April 2010 09:19
 

I suppose I would attempt to blazon it as a corral - perhaps a six-sided corral with a gate in base.

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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29 April 2010 09:45
 

I’m glad Ton weighed in; I thought I recalled this charge in 17th-18th century Dutch iconography (from Simon Schama’s The Embarrassment of Riches), but didn’t have it to hand to verify the recollection.

According to Schama, the motif originates from the siege of the town of Hagesteyn by Count William VI of Holland.  The surrender of the town was achieved only at the price of acknowledging the rights and liberties of the inhabitants, and William acknowledged the agreement by issuing a seal showing "a fenced enclosure to indicate the constraints on feudal power."  It morphed into a symbol of Dutch national identity during the Spanish sieges of the 1570s, when the Tuin was shown either being defended by the Netherlands lion rampant with sword and arrows or protecting the peace and freedom loving Hollands maid, as in the examples provided by Ton.  Schama even shows an elaborate allegory with the enclosure surrounding a fruitful garden with the Hollands maid enthroned at the back and the lion guarding the gate.

 
Dohrman Byers
 
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Dohrman Byers
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29 April 2010 15:20
 

Fascinating! I would never have thought of a fenced enclosure as a symbol of liberty.

I checked Neubecker’s Lexikon and found gates and fences and things surrounded by fences, but not just the fenced enclosure itself.

 

As for a blazon, I’ve been thinking of: Gules a fenced enclosure of six sides with a closed gate to the fore Argent.

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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29 April 2010 15:58
 

Dohrman Byers;76228 wrote:

Fascinating! I would never have thought of a fenced enclosure as a symbol of liberty.

I checked Neubecker’s Lexikon and found gates and fences and things surrounded by fences, but not just the fenced enclosure itself.

 

As for a blazon, I’ve been thinking of: Gules a fenced enclosure of six sides with a closed gate to the fore Argent.


Why not just "gules a fenced enclosure argent?"  Unless there’s some symbolic importance to the six sides and the location of the gate.

 
emrys
 
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emrys
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29 April 2010 16:03
 

if you use google earth and go to the coordinates

55 35 33.01 N 4 46 47.09 E zoom in and click on the foto option you can see a statue with a lion and a Hollandse tuin on the monument to Engelbrecht van Nassau.

 
liongam
 
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liongam
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30 April 2010 03:30
 

Dear All,

To be more succinct.  How about the following?:

 

‘Gules a pen argent’ alternatively ‘Gules a gated pen argent’

 

Again, as Joseph has mentioned there is no reason for the position of the gate or the number of the sides of the ‘pen’ to be blazoned unless you really wish to be pedantic.

 

Regards

 

John

 
Dohrman Byers
 
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Dohrman Byers
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30 April 2010 11:55
 

Thanks Joe & John.

I’m all for simplicity, but wasn’t sure how much detail to include in the blazon. I thought I should mention the gate, since I can envision a fenced enclosure without one e.g. surrounding a tree or statue.

 

"Pen" sounds too small. "Yard"—not the three foot variety—seems more the sense of the Czech word.

 

What about: Gules a fenced yard Argent? Could one count on a "yard" needing a gate?

 

Ton—I can’t wait to try that!

 
Jay Bohn
 
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Jay Bohn
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30 April 2010 15:34
 

Dohrman Byers;76256 wrote:

What about: Gules a fenced yard Argent? Could one count on a "yard" needing a gate?


If you mention "yard," doesn’t that mean the grass (or whatever) within the fence is part of the arms?

 
Dohrman Byers
 
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Dohrman Byers
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30 April 2010 23:27
 

Jay Bohn;76262 wrote:

If you mention "yard," doesn’t that mean the grass (or whatever) within the fence is part of the arms?


I don’t think so. Most farmyards have little or no grass. We Americans often use the words "lawn" and "yard" as synonymous; but while a lawn implies grass, a yard may be paved (a courtyard) or muddy (a farmyard) as well as grassy.

 

This blazon is an odd puzzle. In a sense, the object that I am trying to represent is space. A "yard" is simply a defined space of ground. It may be defined by fences, walls, walkways, buildings or hedges and may be grassy, paved, or bare earth. In this design, I just happen to have used a fence and left the ground surface unspecified.

 

The blazon Gules a fenced yard Argent isn’t quite accurate since it is the fence and gate, not the yard itself, that is Argent. The yard is…well…Gules, I guess.

 

Another attempt: Gules a yard enclosed by a fence and gate Argent.

 
Jay Bohn
 
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Jay Bohn
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01 May 2010 16:16
 

Dohrman Byers;76274 wrote:

The blazon Gules a fenced yard Argent isn’t quite accurate since it is the fence and gate, not the yard itself, that is Argent. The yard is…well…Gules, I guess.

Another attempt: Gules a yard enclosed by a fence and gate Argent.


That was more my point than asserting that a yard had to have grass. "Yard" at least implies the thing that is fenced, not merely the fence. I think what your depicting is more like "Gules, an enclosure argent."