Hypothetical arms for J.B. Mansfield

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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Kenneth Mansfield
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01 July 2010 15:21
 

From The Flags of Civil War North Carolina
Quote:

The charge of the 26th Regiment North Carolina State Troops at the battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863, particularly the casualties taken surrounding the regimental colors.

"All to a man were at once up and ready, every officer at his post. Colonel Burgwyn in the center, Lieutenant Colonel Lane on the right, Major Jones on the left. Our gallant standard-bearer, J.B. Mansfield, at once stepped to his position - four paces to the front, and the eight color guards to their proper places. At the command "Forward, march!" all to a man stepped off, apparently as willingly and as proudly as if they were on review."


Here is the flag my great-great-grandfather carried 147 years ago today in the first day’s fight at Gettysburg. He was the first of 14 men to carry the flag that day. He was wounded and then taken prisoner three days later when the Yanks captured the hospital wagon he was in.


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Jefferson B. Mansfield was a tobacco farmer and wagon wheel maker. This is a hypothetical design I came up with for arms for him. While I wouldn’t put the battle flag in a design for any of my other Confederate ancestors, J.B. is the only color sergeant ever listed in the regimental histories and rosters of the North Carolina 26th Infantry.


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Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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01 July 2010 16:49
 

Kenneth,

A terrific story and a wonderful heritage, but I have qualms about the canton. It seems like a self-awarded (OK, descendant-awarded) augmentation, to which I have a bit of an allergy. Plus a canton of what amounts to the recognized national symbol of a country is typically a really, really high honor, the kind of things victorious field marshals receive.

 

May I suggest that a reference to your ancestor’s service in the form of a crest would be more appropriate?  "From a wreath of the colors an arm embowed vested in the uniform of a Confederate color sergeant grasping the battle flag of the 26th North Carolina proper."

 

Thanks for the reminder of the anniversary by the way. My great-great-grandfather was wounded 147 years ago tomorrow, somewhere between Pitzer’s Wood and the crest of Cemetery Ridge.

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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Kenneth Mansfield
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01 July 2010 17:26
 

I can see your point about the canton, though it really does make a perfect canton, doesn’t it? How about this, then?


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I had seven direct and (found to date) 21 collateral ancestors who fought in the Confederate armies. Of the seven direct, four were at Gettysburg.

 
 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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01 July 2010 17:46
 

Good lord, you’re fast on the draw (literally).

Is there a way to arrange the arm so that the three light blue downward pointing chevrons of a sergeant would be visible?  Perhaps using a sinister arm would help; it would make the outside of the upper sleeve visible.

 

(I had assumed that color sergeants had a distinctive badge, but apparently that was not the case until the US Army created one (3 chevrons and a star) after the war.)

 
Donnchadh
 
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Donnchadh
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01 July 2010 19:03
 

i love this. simply awesome! a fantastic way to bring one’s family heritage into modern-day armory. i liked the canton very much, but i can see what Joe is talking about. still, you are right it is a great canton. the crest is an excellent means of delivery on your point. i like Joe’s idea of the sinister arm so we can see the chevrons. i’m looking forward to seeing this when done!

p.s. i wonder how hard, or appropriate, it would be for the AHS to have an armorial page we could link to for society armigers to post for their ancestors in such momentous events as the Civil War be they newly adopted by their ancestors or granted of old (like the armigers page or the early American ones etc)? for me it would be like seeing a heraldic, historic pictorial…which would be just awesome.

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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Kenneth Mansfield
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01 July 2010 20:43
 

Sinister arm showing sergeant’s stripes:
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http://img42.imageshack.us/img42/333/mansfieldjb3.png
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Donnchadh
 
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Donnchadh
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02 July 2010 00:36
 

i like it!

8)

 
Charles E. Drake
 
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Charles E. Drake
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02 July 2010 01:18
 

I like it as well.

I had eight ancestors who fought for the Confederacy, though none at Gettysburg, as far as I know. Those who were in units which were at Gettysburg were either killed, wounded, or captured before they got that far.

 
James Dempster
 
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James Dempster
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02 July 2010 01:43
 

I like the arms, but I’ve never been comfortable with crests that consist of arms embowed bearing something. They always appear to me to be the last hurrah of someone sinking into the mire.

The Setons of Pitmedden had a similar family member. John Seton of Pitmedden, father of the 1st Baronet, so too recent to be an "ancestor", was killed in 1639 whilst bearing the royalist colours at the Battle of the Bridge of Dee in the 1st Bishops’ War, which was the Scottish precursor of the Civil War over here. As a result when the arms were matriculated in Lyon Register both the crest, differencing and motto were related to the event.

 

http://americanheraldry.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=29&pictureid=736

 

The above is not that great a scan from an online edition of Nisbet, I’ll get a better one when I have more time. The difference is a man’s heart distilling blood (John Seton was cut in half by a cannon ball). Sadly, modern emblazons of the arms tend to have a generic 18th century soldier which rather misses the point.

 

A rambling post to suggest that a demi-man in the uniform of a Confederate colour sergeant bearing the battle flag of the 26th North Carolina proper might look better.

 

James

 
Guy Power
 
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Guy Power
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02 July 2010 03:23
 

Great idea!!  It looks very nice with the flag as a crest instead of canton.  An alternative would be for crest a demi-man dressed as a Confederate Color Sergeant bearing the Confederate battle flag in both hands.

As to Confederate ancestors .... I’ll pipe in as well.  I’ve had about 6 total ancestors serve the Confederacy—one was my Irish immigrant ancestor, John A. Power who was a private in the Georgia Hussars (later attached as Company F of the Jeff Davis Legion).  Two or three of Broughtons ... though I cannot remember their names, and a father & son team both in the same regiment, 66th Georgia Infantry: Sergeant Wiley J. Hodges and his son John English Hodges.  Paw was killed by a sniper 13 March 1865; sonny boy lost a leg but survived the war.

 

—Guy

 

Rats!!  I see that whilst I was composing my answer .... and (let’s face it) being sidetracked .... JAMES provided the same suggestion one hour earlier than I!  All I can say, James, is that great minds think alike!

 
eploy
 
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eploy
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02 July 2010 08:05
 

Nice design and I love the stories.  Thanks all for sharing.

 
Chuck Glass
 
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Chuck Glass
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02 July 2010 08:44
 

I have to chime in as well.  I have ancestors who fought on both sides during the Civil War.  The only war story I ever heard was about my grandmother’s Confederate great-grandfather who went through the war without a scratch.  Upon arriving home, he saw his wife doing the wash at the creek and decided to surprise her.  He laid his gun against the fencepost, and as he was sneaking up behind her, the gun fell, discharged, killing him on the spot.  As I began putting the family history together, I noticed that his death date was before the war ended, not after it was over, so I checked into his service record and found that he had deserted!  I love that bit of irony, and this is my favorite story to share with fellow genealogists.

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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Kenneth Mansfield
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02 July 2010 08:48
 

Well, I just got off the phone with my brother who informed me to two errors. Firstly :oops: I was thinking of another ancestor when it came to the wheelwright business, so there is no point in having the wagon wheel on there. That makes it much more likely to be a duplicate, so I have changed the chevron to three chevronnels. This is all hypothetical anyway, but I would probably try to come up with something else to make it unique were I to actually do something with it.

The other thing he mentioned is that North Carolina supplied its own uniforms and the NC regulations specified black as the color for infantry, so I have changed the colors of the stripes on the sleeve.


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Peter Harling
 
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Peter Harling
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02 July 2010 09:04
 

You must be a very proud man Kenneth, as should all whose ancesters are mentioned here.

As Joseph mentioned, a canton would not be appropriate, but recognition in the crest much more suitable. I rather fancy the demi-man in uniform myself.

Why is it that John Wayne always fought on the side of the Union? LOL.

Regards ..............  Peter

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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02 July 2010 11:16
 

Peter Harling;77304 wrote:

Why is it that John Wayne always fought on the side of the Union?


He didn’t—in "The Searchers" he played an ex-Confederate officer.  Most of the movies in which you see him wearing the blue U.S. uniform are set after the Recent Unpleasantness.

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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Kenneth Mansfield
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02 July 2010 11:52
 

Probably sufficiently unique for my purposes: Sable three Chevronnels between three Cinquefoils each pierced with a mullet Argent. I may work on the demi-soldier over the weekend, but that’s more than I have time for right now.


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