Heraldically compliant (reluctantly) 6 year old

 
Charles E. Drake
 
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Charles E. Drake
Total Posts:  553
Joined  27-05-2006
 
 
 
29 August 2010 23:56
 

We recently had the opportunity to visit the Higgins Armory Museum in Worcester, MA.  It has a wonderful display of arms and armour, with a bit of heraldry.

http://americanheraldry.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=59&pictureid=832

 

One activity they have for children is the opportunity to design a coat of arms on a shield blank made of cardboard.

 

My daughter did this, with my guidance, and here is the result:

 

 

http://americanheraldry.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=59&pictureid=833

 

This is the closest we could get to a wyvern or dragon gules. Be assured I would not have chosen orange otherwise. grin

 

The room was filled with children and their parents, and quite a few heads turned when I insisted that she not place gold on silver! I also got a few stares when I called the "flowers" cinquefoils. Finally, my daughter wanted to write the surname on the shield, as most of the children were doing, and I said that "no, for that would be an abomination!"

 

At least at this tender an age, I could influence the process.

 
Alexander Liptak
 
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Alexander Liptak
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30 August 2010 00:22
 

The looks you would have gotten had you insisted she be given a lozenge, less they insult the dignity of your fair lady-like daughter. grin

 
eploy
 
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eploy
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30 August 2010 05:54
 

I love the story Charles.  Thanks for sharing.  I’m the same way with my kids.  Glad to know I’m not the only one.  :D

 
Charles E. Drake
 
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Charles E. Drake
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30 August 2010 13:11
 

xanderliptak;78861 wrote:

The looks you would have gotten had you insisted she be given a lozenge, less they insult the dignity of your fair lady-like daughter. grin


I would have chosen a lozenge for her, but that wasn’t an option.

 

When one pays the required fee for the craft, one is given a cardboard blank, which only comes as a shield. It has a strap of elastic stapled on the back as a hand-hold. The budding heraldist then uses the blank as a template to cut the field from a sheet of poster paper. The paper is pre-cut so that there is enough for the shield with the left-over piece going into a pile from which to choose a color for the charges. The templates for the charges are small enough to fit into the left-over portion from the poster paper. This does make the charges rather small, hence the small size of our gryphon.

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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30 August 2010 13:54
 

Charles E. Drake;78860 wrote:

http://americanheraldry.org/forums/picture.php?albumid=59&pictureid=833

 

This is the closest we could get to a wyvern or dragon gules. Be assured I would not have chosen orange otherwise. wink


Quote:

The room was filled with children and their parents, and quite a few heads turned when I insisted that she not place gold on silver! I also got a few stares when I called the "flowers" cinquefoils.


Of course, they are both flowers and cinquefoils.

 
Charles E. Drake
 
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Charles E. Drake
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30 August 2010 16:19
 

Joseph McMillan;78865 wrote:

There is no such thing as orange—this is clearly red, just red chosen from the shorter end of the wave-length spectrum!  wink


Right. I just wish they had chosen a longer wave-length gules while they were at it.