Mullet of Eight Points Variations

 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
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Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
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29 December 2010 21:54
 

The standard mullet of eight points is pretty straight forward and has rays of equal length radiating out in the eight compass directions.

I have seen that the Army Institute of Heraldry has termed a version of the mullet as a "compass star" and the instance which I saw of this also had equal length rays, though all seemed to be shorter than I am used to seeing (wider angled rays).

 

What i’d like to find out, is if there is a precedant for using an eight pointed mullet which has elongated rays in the horizontal and vertical, but shortened rays in the diagonal (like you might see in renderings of the Star of Bethlehem).

 

I’ve searched far and wide, and the closest I’ve seen to standardized terms for elongation occur with estoiles (wavy rays).

 

:mullet:

 

http://www.murfreesboropost.com/photos/Full8312.jpg

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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29 December 2010 22:51
 

I suspect Fr. Guy Selvester has information on this, but it’s an opportune moment to plead for this charge in this usage not to be called a "mullet."  A mullet/molet is supposed to represent the rowel of a spur.  This is a "star."

 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
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30 December 2010 01:25
 

Makes perfect sense to me to refer to it as a star… obviously estoille actually means a star in the cosmic sense, but heraldically seems only to refer to wavy lined rays.

They actually call mullets (which as you say refer to spurs) "stars" in scottish heraldry when they are not pierced don’t they?

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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30 December 2010 07:25
 

JBGarrison;80819 wrote:

Makes perfect sense to me to refer to it as a star… obviously estoille actually means a star in the cosmic sense, but heraldically seems only to refer to wavy lined rays.


In English heraldry, yes.  On the Continent, the standard five-pointed star is an ├ętoile, Stern, estrella, stella, ster, etc, sometimes specified as being of five points or rays.


Quote:

They actually call mullets (which as you say refer to spurs) "stars" in scottish heraldry when they are not pierced don’t they?


Erratically, yes.  I am given to understand that this was the old tradition, but "mullet/molet" is also used, probably as a result of English cultural influence.

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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30 December 2010 10:00
 

Hmmm. It appears that both Fr. Guy’s website and blog are down.

 
 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
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31 December 2010 08:42
 

Per Mr. Mansfield’s and others’ comments in both this and another thread, I’m gonna go ahead and stand confidently on this star as "Compass Rose of Eight Points."

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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31 December 2010 10:56
 

JBGarrison;80831 wrote:

Per Mr. Mansfield’s and others’ comments in both this and another thread, I’m gonna go ahead and stand confidently on this star as "Compass Rose of Eight Points."


Well, whatever you prefer, but do you intend it to represent a compass rose (allusion to navigation, etc.) or do you intend it to represent a star?  If the latter, I would recommend blazoning it as such.

 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
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31 December 2010 11:49
 

Joseph McMillan;80834 wrote:

but do you intend it to represent a compass rose (allusion to navigation, etc.) or do you intend it to represent a star?


Oh, for the case in question, it’s intended to be star I believe.  Was just going off of what I found on TIOH, but yes, that makes more sense so "compass star of eight points" it is then.  Thanks Mr. McMillan.

 

Anyone disagree? :o

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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Joseph McMillan
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31 December 2010 13:23
 

Just "star of eight points" will work.

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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31 December 2010 15:52
 

Joseph McMillan;80840 wrote:

Just "star of eight points" will work.

I am more or less inclined to agree with that, but don’t you think it likely that, not looking at an illustration, one would assume the star to have equal-length points?

 
 
Jonathan Dominguez
 
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31 December 2010 17:54
 

Kenneth Mansfield;80843 wrote:

I am more or less inclined to agree with that, but don’t you think it likely that, not looking at an illustration, one would assume the star to have equal-length points?

Right, that’s the sticking point. Personally, I think a star of 8 equal points would start to look like some sort of seal stamp. Really I know that, I made one in Photoshop…

 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
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31 December 2010 22:09
 

I believe most people would emblazon "star of eight points" the same way as a mullet of eight points (all equal length rays).  Would they be correct in doing this?

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
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31 December 2010 22:57
 

JBGarrison;80846 wrote:

I believe most people would emblazon "star of eight points" the same way as a mullet of eight points (all equal length rays).  Would they be correct in doing this?

They would not be incorrect. Neither would they be incorrect to emblazon it the way you’d like it.

 
 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
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01 January 2011 00:46
 

Kenneth Mansfield;80847 wrote:

They would not be incorrect. Neither would they be incorrect to emblazon it the way you’d like it.


Thanks Mr. Mansfield, that brings us back full circle… my point is to blazon it in such a way that it must be interpreted as a star with eight points such that the horizontal and vertical rays are longer than the diagonal rays.

 

I think the basis of the problem here is that the charge I’m trying to clarify blazon for is not traditional heraldry.

 
Joseph McMillan
 
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01 January 2011 09:15
 

There is no way to blazon anything (at least not correctly) that will guarantee a charge can be depicted one and only one way.  Even an ordinary such as a pale or fess can vary in width to some degree.  Blazoning something as a mullet (or five-pointed star) does not ensure that the artist will depict it with the geometric regularity we’re used to seeing on the American flag.

Blazoning this charge as a compass rose may suggest but does not guarantee unequal length points.  Here’s a drawing of an actual medieval compass rose (1492).  Note that the 45 degree points are the same length as the cardinal points; note also the curvature of the points.  An artist might well decide to take this as his model to draw your compass rose; why not?

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4b/WInd_Rose_Aguiar.svg/225px-WInd_Rose_Aguiar.svg.png

 
Arthur Radburn
 
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01 January 2011 09:35
 

JBGarrison;80850 wrote:

my point is to blazon it in such a way that it must be interpreted as a star with eight points such that the horizontal and vertical rays are longer than the diagonal rays.


To try and achieve the result you’re looking for, I think you’d need to word the blazon very prescriptively, e.g. as "an eight-pointed star the cardinal points longer than the diagonals".  But, even so, it’d still be up to each individual artist to decide on the relative lengths of the points.