A sufficiently original blazon?

 
John Crowley
 
Avatar
 
 
John Crowley
Total Posts:  4
Joined  11-04-2009
 
 
 
08 March 2011 17:05
 

I’ve checked the resources at my command, Papworth and Balfour-Paul mainly, and I THINK the following blazon may be sufficiently unique to use without infringment.

Sable, a fess engrailed between three cross crosslets or.

 

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

 
Guy Power
 
Avatar
 
 
Guy Power
Total Posts:  1576
Joined  05-01-2006
 
 
 
08 March 2011 19:35
 

Mascles v. cross crosslets:

MITCHELL OF LANDATH

 

Sable a fess engrailed between three mascles Or.

 

http://www.heraldry-online.org.uk/mitchell/mitchell-landath.jpg

 

Yours is a nice emblazon; question: would your cross crosslets imply a relationship to Mitchell of Landath?

 

—Guy

 
Jeff Poole
 
Avatar
 
 
Jeff Poole
Total Posts:  138
Joined  07-03-2009
 
 
 
09 March 2011 03:26
 

Guy Power;81658 wrote:

Mascles v. cross crosslets:

MITCHELL OF LANDATH

 

Sable a fess engrailed between three mascles Or.

 

http://www.heraldry-online.org.uk/mitchell/mitchell-landath.jpg

 

Yours is a nice emblazon; question: would your cross crosslets imply a relationship to Mitchell of Landath?

 

—Guy


It might to a serious student of Heraldry, but as it’s in a totally different jurisdiction I wouldn’t lose too much sleep over it, but it might pay to check what American registries you can. Perhaps even the Canadian one given the proximity.

 
Michael F. McCartney
 
Avatar
 
 
Michael F. McCartney
Total Posts:  3535
Joined  24-05-2004
 
 
 
09 March 2011 23:44
 

FWIW (which may not be all that much!)—

I’d be amazed if such a simple and elegant coat was not already hanging in someone else’s closet—but if not, then go for it!

Just curious— is there some intended symbolism or allusion intended, or just the beauty of the design?  (which is of course quite sufficient, if sufficiently unique)

 
John Crowley
 
Avatar
 
 
John Crowley
Total Posts:  4
Joined  11-04-2009
 
 
 
10 March 2011 17:43
 

A cousin and I designed arms in memory of our grandfather. Since then, we have discovered much more about his background. He is descended (illegitimately) from the Scots Peebles family and the English Tillers or Tillyers. Although not a blood relation, he identified very strongly with his Irish Crowley surname. I took the sable shield and fess from the Tiller/Tillyer arms as displayed in the Parish Church of Harmondsworth (We match the Harmondsworth Tillyers’ Y-DNA, so there is certainly a relationship. The engrailment comes from the engrailed chevron on the Peebles arms as given by Nisbet and others. The Cross Crosslets are from the Crowleys of Carberry in County Cork.

I like the simplicity of this design, but as you say, therein lies the problem. Still, I have googled the blazon and searched as well as I am able, and cannot find a coat exactly like it in either lines or tinctures.