design or charges to represent entoptic graphomania

 
Daniel C. Boyer
 
Avatar
 
 
Daniel C. Boyer
Total Posts:  1104
Joined  16-03-2005
 
 
 
12 May 2011 21:29
 

Does anyone think a fret, or fretty, sable, would be a good charge or pattern for someone who practiced entoptic graphomania? As a badge or in arms. Ideally it should be fretty and clouee sable but there is an obvious problem here.

 
Benjamin Thornton
 
Avatar
 
 
Benjamin Thornton
Total Posts:  449
Joined  04-09-2009
 
 
 
12 May 2011 23:34
 

Well, I guess there are hobbies more esoteric than heraldry.

I’ve never studied art, and had not heard of entopic graphomania until now, but when I used to chair an arts granting agency, I was continually and pleasantly surprised by the breadth and depth of what was new to me.  In any case, I think you’re on the right symbolic track.

 
Kathy McClurg
 
Avatar
 
 
Kathy McClurg
Total Posts:  1274
Joined  13-03-2009
 
 
 
13 May 2011 03:39
 

I agree with Ben in the first point.

I’ve stated many times I’m not an artist.

 

I’m not even sure I understand what it is now that I’ve "googled" it….

 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
Avatar
 
 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
Total Posts:  1006
Joined  10-03-2009
 
 
 
13 May 2011 06:28
 

I don’t think Fretty would be a good representation of entoptic graphomania because fretty implies a geometrically consistent pattern.

As I have just now come to understand entoptic graphomania from google and brief study, the art form is rather un-patterned.  Entoptic graphomania pieces could be compared to frets… which have been melted, stretched, warped, ...and then put in spin cylcle for 30 minutes? :D

 

This just my opinion though.

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
Avatar
 
 
Kenneth Mansfield
Total Posts:  2518
Joined  04-06-2007
 
 
 
13 May 2011 10:07
 

Jeffrey Boyd Garrison;82934 wrote:

I don’t think Fretty would be a good representation of entoptic graphomania because fretty implies a geometrically consistent pattern.

I concur with Jeffrey on this point.

 
 
Nick B II
 
Avatar
 
 
Nick B II
Total Posts:  203
Joined  26-11-2007
 
 
 
13 May 2011 11:42
 

Kathy McClurg;82929 wrote:

I agree with Ben in the first point.

I’ve stated many times I’m not an artist.

 

I’m not even sure I understand what it is now that I’ve "googled" it….


Let’s see if I’ve got it. Here are the steps in making an entonptic graphomania drawing:

 

1) Get a blank sheet of paper.

 

2) Scan it carefully for any imperfections. Mark those with dots.

 

3) Connect the dots.

 

4) Add points and lines between points until satisfied.

 

The advantage here is that you can make a genuine piece of surrealist art for a few pennies. You need paper and pencil, and you’d better not spend much on the paper or there won’t be any flaws for you to mark.

 

It probably makes a lot more sense to people who don’t suspect surrealist art is simply a manifestation of the teenage desire to tell one’s mother that she is a) a worthless philistine, and b) that she is intellectually incapable of understanding one’s brilliance.

 

But on the original question:

I have no idea how you’d represent this heraldically. I suspect you’d have to specify entonptic graphomania in the blazon, and then be content with having every emblazonment look completely different from every other emblazonment because each sheet of paper is unique.

 

Nick

 
Benjamin Thornton
 
Avatar
 
 
Benjamin Thornton
Total Posts:  449
Joined  04-09-2009
 
 
 
13 May 2011 11:59
 

Jeffrey Boyd Garrison;82934 wrote:

I don’t think Fretty would be a good representation of entoptic graphomania because fretty implies a geometrically consistent pattern.


Recanting my first instinct, this is a good point.  Fretty captures the complexity (and the linear allusions) an entopic graphomaniac might seek, but not necessarily the intrinsic disorder.

 

But since blazon strives for order (that is, recognizable reproducibility by different artists working in different styles in different mediums), perhaps it’s an impossible task.

 
Daniel C. Boyer
 
Avatar
 
 
Daniel C. Boyer
Total Posts:  1104
Joined  16-03-2005
 
 
 
13 May 2011 14:50
 

Benjamin Thornton;82926 wrote:

Well, I guess there are hobbies more esoteric than heraldry.


http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/work/image/262021/mf2ji7/23924_10150092015805232_837005231_11549937_1568269_n.jpg

(My entoptic graphomania "The Two Iraqi Boys")

 

Well, this is true in general, but in my case it’s not a hobby as I’ve worked full-time as an artist (this is my "day job") since 1999 and a significant percentage of my work has been entoptic graphomanias (I’ve exhibited them in a group show and a number of other shows in addition to my other visual and invisible works (not kidding with this last—I’ve had drawings in invisible ink in some group shows)) since I discovered the method in 1998.

 

I was vaguely thinking about this subject as I was considering development of a badge, most probably for use on a standard.

 
Daniel C. Boyer
 
Avatar
 
 
Daniel C. Boyer
Total Posts:  1104
Joined  16-03-2005
 
 
 
13 May 2011 14:52
 

Benjamin Thornton;82956 wrote:

Recanting my first instinct, this is a good point.  Fretty captures the complexity (and the linear allusions) an entopic graphomaniac might seek, but not necessarily the intrinsic disorder.

But since blazon strives for order (that is, recognizable reproducibility by different artists working in different styles in different mediums), perhaps it’s an impossible task.


There are basically two types, one with straight lines and the other with curvy or wavy, but I’ve never really been interested in the latter.  The only thing I was thinking along those lines is, is there a way to incline fretty, so to speak?  Though this might not be the best approach.

 
Daniel C. Boyer
 
Avatar
 
 
Daniel C. Boyer
Total Posts:  1104
Joined  16-03-2005
 
 
 
13 May 2011 14:56
 

Nick B II;82951 wrote:

Let’s see if I’ve got it. Here are the steps in making an entonptic graphomania drawing:

1) Get a blank sheet of paper.

 

2) Scan it carefully for any imperfections. Mark those with dots.

 

3) Connect the dots.

 

4) Add points and lines between points until satisfied.

 

The advantage here is that you can make a genuine piece of surrealist art for a few pennies. You need paper and pencil, and you’d better not spend much on the paper or there won’t be any flaws for you to mark.

 

It probably makes a lot more sense to people who don’t suspect surrealist art is simply a manifestation of the teenage desire to tell one’s mother that she is a) a worthless philistine, and b) that she is intellectually incapable of understanding one’s brilliance.

 

But on the original question:

I have no idea how you’d represent this heraldically. I suspect you’d have to specify entonptic graphomania in the blazon, and then be content with having every emblazonment look completely different from every other emblazonment because each sheet of paper is unique.

 

Nick


Well, entoptic graphomania is really a sort of extra-aesthetic (this is a significant aspect of surrealism in general) form of drawing.  The entire theoretical apparatus behind it is too tangential to go into in these forums.  The approach of blazoning an entoptic graphomania is to my mind clearly inadequate as it is too variable and subjective in the interpretation of the emblazonment.  I was thinking something along the lines of fretty and clouee sable but the clouee sable is problematic as it will be on the fretty that is already sable…  By the way, pen is really so much better than paper for this, and my experience is different pens are better and worse.

 
Daniel C. Boyer
 
Avatar
 
 
Daniel C. Boyer
Total Posts:  1104
Joined  16-03-2005
 
 
 
13 May 2011 14:58
 

Kathy McClurg;82929 wrote:

I agree with Ben in the first point.

I’ve stated many times I’m not an artist.

 

I’m not even sure I understand what it is now that I’ve "googled" it….


Nick B II has a pretty good explanation below, but I’m not sure 4) is really part of it…

 
Kenneth Mansfield
 
Avatar
 
 
Kenneth Mansfield
Total Posts:  2518
Joined  04-06-2007
 
 
 
13 May 2011 16:37
 

I wonder if you might be better off with a spider’s web than fretty. While it will be seen simply as a spider’s web to most people, it can represent this artform to you and it comes much closer than a piece of lattice work.

 
 
Kathy McClurg
 
Avatar
 
 
Kathy McClurg
Total Posts:  1274
Joined  13-03-2009
 
 
 
13 May 2011 18:45
 

What if you used two spider’s webs conjoined….  That could be very random for many artists…  potentially o two emblazons would be exactly alike.

 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
 
Avatar
 
 
Jeffrey Boyd Garrison
Total Posts:  1006
Joined  10-03-2009
 
 
 
13 May 2011 18:51
 

The spider’s web idea is brilliant… I would love to see an example of this rendered! :p

 
Alexander Liptak
 
Avatar
 
 
Alexander Liptak
Total Posts:  846
Joined  06-06-2008
 
 
 
14 May 2011 00:57
 

The town of Aasiaat, on Greenland, uses a spider’s web on its coat of arms. Aasiaat means "spiders", in case one wonders why they would choose such a thing. The field is parted per fess argent and azure with a spiderweb throughout counterchanged.

Some heraldic knots might work well, as curved lines could also be used to make an entopic graphomania.

 

Or how would something gyrrony and counterchanged look? Such as gyronny this and that a fret counterchanged, or a gyronny offset and per saltire counterchanged and so forth.

 
Benjamin Thornton
 
Avatar
 
 
Benjamin Thornton
Total Posts:  449
Joined  04-09-2009
 
 
 
14 May 2011 23:05
 

xanderliptak;83000 wrote:

Or how would something gyrrony and counterchanged look? Such as gyronny this and that a fret counterchanged, or a gyronny offset and per saltire counterchanged and so forth.


I whipped this up at http://web.meson.org/blazonserver/

 

http://web.meson.org/blazonserver/emblazon.php?format=png&blazon=Gyronny+of+sixteen+argent+and+sable+a+fret+counterchanged

 

Gyronny of sixteen argent and sable a fret counterchanged.  It’s certainly jarring and linear, but it lacks the randomicity that appears (to this unschooled viewer) in the entopic graphomania example posted.